basicaHumanoid Robotics

Since 2001, our group has been pioneering medical robotics using geometric methods. We have been developing medical robot units using Clifford’s geometric algebra and fuzzy nonlinear and sliding mode control. We have worked with manipulating arms and Barret’s spherical hand supported by binocular heads, mobile robots equipped with stereo, SICK laser, omnidirectional vision, and odometry. Computational vision methods have been developed and fuzzy nonlinear and sliding mode techniques applied in these systems. Since 2009, we have been developing low-cost humanoid robots: the Mexone 100 cms and 30 DOF, with torque measurement and eight sensors on the sole of each foot connected to ROS for the modelling and development of control algorithms in a virtual environment, executable in line with the robot. Libraries that include routines for conformal geometric algebra calculations for perception, inverse and differential kinematics, dynamics and algorithms, are used for generating walking and control patterns. The tetraocular head has two stereo Dragonfly cameras, an RGB-d Primesense camera and a Colibri IMU. There are two on board computers connected to the Ethernet, one for low-level control and another for image processing. This prototype is a contribution to the community or any research group with low resources, given its size and hardware characteristics and especially due to its size. You can request a copy of the same in order to carry out basic research in a low cost professional humanoid robot. In 2014, the construction of a second robot was completed, the 160cm, 32 DOF CINVESREEM. The torso uses Dynamixel motors and was built by us, while the pelvis and the feet were constructed by PAL Robotics of Barcelona, Spain. It uses harmonic point drivers and torque sensors on its ankles. The robot has an autonomous four-hour alkaline battery and two on board computers connected to the Ethernet, one for low-level control and another for image processing. This robot is connected to a server with the ROS system in order to develop kinematic and dynamic models such as the walking pattern generation algorithms as well as those of control, which can be executed online in the robot. Libraries that include routines for conformal geometric algebra calculations for perception, inverse and differential kinematics, dynamics, and algorithms are used for generating walking and control patterns. These robots allow the development of basic research as well as the generation of subproducts such as bionic hands and feet and an intelligent guidance system for the visually impaired. The construction and development of algorithms for the SMART-GUIDE system for the visually impaired is currently being finalized and consists of: two cameras, IMU, GPS, sound sensors, and a miniature computer that connects to a remote server to receive support from cyberspace, similar to a cell phone. This device generated two patents.